What is Carisoprodol and What is Carisoprodol Side Effects ?

Carisoprodol ( Generic Soma ) is a controlled substance and you can not buy it online. Buying Carisoprodol or Selling Carisoprodol online are both illegal. For more Muscle Relaxant prescription information, please check this link.

If you want to buy Carisoprodol online, I suggest you buy Zanaflex, Flexeril, or other muscle relaxant instead.

What is carisoprodol?

Carisoprodol is a muscle relaxer that blocks pain sensations between the nerves and the brain.

Carisoprodol is used together with rest and physical therapy to treat skeletal muscle conditions such as pain or injury.

Carisoprodol should only be used for short periods (up to two or three weeks) because there is no evidence of its effectiveness in long term use and most skeletal muscle injuries are generally of short duration. Carisoprodol is considered a controlled substance in the United States.

Important Information

You should not take carisoprodol if you have porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system).

Carisoprodol may be habit-forming. Never share this medicine with another person. Misuse of habit-forming medicine can cause addiction, overdose, or death.

Carisoprodol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase drowsiness and dizziness caused by this medicine.

You may have withdrawal symptoms when you stop using this medicine after using it over a long period of time. Do not stop using this medication suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

How to use Carisoprodol

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor. Do not increase your dose or use this drug more often or for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. This medication should only be used short-term (for 3 weeks or less) unless directed by your doctor.

If you suddenly stop using this medication, you may have withdrawal symptoms (such as stomach cramps, trouble sleeping, headache, nausea). To help prevent withdrawal, your doctor may lower your dose slowly. Withdrawal is more likely if you have used carisoprodol for a long time or in high doses. Tell your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have withdrawal.

Though it helps many people, this medication may sometimes cause addiction. This risk may be higher if you have a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol). Take this medication exactly as prescribed to lower the risk of addiction. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists after 2 to 3 weeks or if it worsens.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to carisoprodol or meprobamate, or if you have:

  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system).

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease; or
  • a seizure.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

Carisoprodol can pass into breast milk and may cause drowsiness in a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

This medicine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 16 years old.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

How should I take carisoprodol?

Take carisoprodol exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets.

Carisoprodol may be habit-forming. Misuse can cause addiction, overdose, or death. Selling or giving away this medicine is against the law.

Carisoprodol is usually taken 3 times per day and at bedtime and should be only be taken for 2 or 3 weeks.. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Do not stop using this medicine suddenly after long-term use, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Carisoprodol is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include rest, physical therapy, or other pain relief measures. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep track of your medicine. Carisoprodol is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using it improperly or without a prescription.

Carisoprodol dosing information

carisoprodol (Generic Soma )
carisoprodol (Generic Soma )

Usual Adult Dose for Muscle Spasm:

250 to 350 mg orally 3 times a day and at bedtime
Duration of therapy: Up to 2 to 3 weeks

Comments:
-This drug should only be used for short periods (up to 2 or 3 weeks) as there is inadequate evidence of effectiveness for more prolonged use and acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions are generally of short duration.

Use: For the relief of discomfort associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of carisoprodol can be fatal, especially if you take it with alcohol or with other drugs that can slow your breathing.

Overdose symptoms may include vision problems, confusion, hallucinations, muscle stiffness, loss of coordination, weak or shallow breathing, fainting, seizure, or coma.

What should I avoid while taking carisoprodol?

Do not drink alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death could occur.

Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you. Dizziness or drowsiness can cause falls, accidents, or severe injuries.

Carisoprodol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to carisoprodol: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

      • a seizure (convulsions); or
      • high levels of serotonin in the body agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea.

Common carisoprodol side effects may include:

      • drowsiness;
      • dizziness; or
      • headache.

Dizziness, drowsiness, or headache may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: confusion.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

All prescription is not recommended to use for a long time. You can use anti-aging products to become yonger and your muscle will become younger. We think exercising is the best way to relieve your pain. Exercising is a very good methods. Exercising can enhance your immune system and increase your muscle strength and make your nerve strong.
You can also take some nutrition from food. USANA Essentials – HealthPak, USANA Nutritions which contains USANA CellSentials™ is very good natural health nutrition for your health and can relieve your headache because of nutrition.

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

Using carisoprodol with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause dangerous side effects or death. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Many drugs can interact with carisoprodol. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medicine only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

How to treat muscle spasms ?

When you have muscle spasms, you can try following nature treatment:

      1. Stretching
      2. Massage
      3. Ice
      4. Heat
      5. Drink Water
      6. Mild exercising

If your muscle spasms doesnot improve, we suggest you take some natural foods to relieve your muscle spasm.

Some OTC medicines and Prescription for muscle spasms

Nonprescription remedies

There are several things you can take by mouth that may help with your muscle spasms:

    • NSAIDs. Over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often bring relief by reducing inflammation and pain.
    • Pickle juice. Drinking a small amount of pickle juice reportedly relieves cramping muscles within 30 to 35 seconds. This is thought to work by restoring electrolyte balance.
    • Supplements. Salt tablets, vitamin B-12, and magnesium supplements are used by some people to treat and prevent muscle spasms. It’s important to note that there’s limited evidence to show that these are effective.
    • Natural muscle relaxers. Natural muscle relaxants include drinking chamomile tea, adding capsaicin to foods, and improving your sleep.

 

Prescription medication for Muscle Spasms

If you have a persisting muscle spasm, especially if it’s severe, your doctor may prescribe a muscle relaxant or a pain medication.

Muscle relaxants used for muscle spasms are called centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxants (SMRs), and are often only prescribed for 2- to 3-week periods.

A List of Skeletal muscle relaxants

 

Drug Name Reviews Avg. Ratings
Antiflex
Generic name: orphenadrine
1 review
  
10
Dantrium (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
2 reviews
  
10
Vanadom
Generic name: carisoprodol
1 review
  
9.0
Soma (Pro)
Generic name: carisoprodol
180 reviews
  
8.9
Zanaflex (Pro)
Generic name: tizanidine
100 reviews
  
7.7
Xeomin (Pro)
Generic name: incobotulinumtoxinA
2 reviews
  
7.5
Amrix (Pro)
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
48 reviews
  
7.3
Myobloc (Pro)
Generic name: rimabotulinumtoxinB
3 reviews
  
7.2
Skelaxin (Pro)
Generic name: metaxalone
82 reviews
  
7.2
Lioresal (Pro)
Generic name: baclofen
20 reviews
  
6.8
Norflex (Pro)
Generic name: orphenadrine
22 reviews
  
6.5
Flexeril (Pro)
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
197 reviews
  
6.3
Robaxin (Pro)
Generic name: methocarbamol
63 reviews
  
6.3
Lorzone (Pro)
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
21 reviews
  
6.2
Dysport (Pro)
Generic name: abobotulinumtoxinA
7 reviews
  
6.1
Botox (Pro)
Generic name: onabotulinumtoxinA
350 reviews
  
5.9
Parafon Forte DSC (Pro)
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
3 reviews
  
5.9
Fexmid (Pro)
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
4 reviews
  
5.8
Gablofen (Pro)
Generic name: baclofen
3 reviews
  
5.8
Robaxin-750
Generic name: methocarbamol
39 reviews
  
5.6
Lioresal Intrathecal
Generic name: baclofen
3 reviews
  
5.2
Botox Cosmetic (Pro)
Generic name: onabotulinumtoxinA
11 reviews
  
4.9
Comfort Pac with Cyclobenzaprine
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
2 reviews
  
4.5
Orfro
Generic name: orphenadrine
0 reviews
  
3.0
Kemstro
Generic name: baclofen
0 reviews
  
2.0
Dantrium Intravenous (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
0 reviews Add rating
Mio-Rel
Generic name: orphenadrine
0 reviews Add rating
Orphenate
Generic name: orphenadrine
0 reviews Add rating
Ozobax (Pro)
Generic name: baclofen
0 reviews Add rating
Paraflex
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
0 reviews Add rating
Remular-S
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
0 reviews Add rating
Revonto (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
0 reviews Add rating
Ryanodex (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
0 reviews Add rating

Although skeletal muscle relaxants are recommended for short-term use in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain, approximately 44.5% of users remain on them for more than a year.

Due to CNS depression, cyclobenzaprine, metaxalone, orphenadrine (Norflex, others), methocarbamol (Robaxin, others), carisoprodol, and chlorzoxazone (Lorzone, Parafon Forte DSC, others) are on the American Geriatrics Society’s Beers List of inappropriate drugs for elderly patients.

Despite this, approximately 300,000 annual prescriptions for skeletal muscle relaxants (15%) are issued to patients older than 65 years of age.

Skeletal muscle relaxants represent a diverse pharmacotherapeutic group of medications across several chemical classes that are structurally dissimilar. These agents are effective for spasticity, skeletal muscle spasms, or both.

Because of the breadth of pharmacologic mechanisms and variable pharmacokinetics, the drugs have a huge range of AEs and potential drug interactions.

Considering that these agents are most often used in the elderly and also as adjuvants for the treatment of chronic pain patients with multiple comorbidities who are likely receiving a polypharmaceutical regimen (including opioids), skeletal muscle drug selection for each patient requires careful attention to these factors.

 

What is muscle spasms and what maybe the reasons of muscle spasms ?

What is a muscle spasm?

A muscle spasm, or muscle cramp, is an involuntary contraction of a muscle. Muscle spasms occur suddenly, usually resolve quickly, and are often painful.

A muscle spasm is different than a muscle twitch. A muscle twitch, or fasciculation, is an uncontrolled fine movement of a small segment of a larger muscle that can be seen under the skin.

Muscle Spasm facts

  • Spasms can affect many different types of muscles in the body, leading to many different symptoms.
  • Spasms of skeletal muscles are most common and are often due to overuse and muscle fatigue, dehydration, and electrolyte abnormalities. The spasm occurs abruptly, is painful, and is usually short-lived. It may be relieved by gently stretching the muscle.
  • If muscle spasms are especially painful, if they do not resolve or if they recur, medical care should be accessed to look for other possible underlying causes.
  • Smooth muscles that are within the walls of hollow organs (like the colon) can go into spasm, causing significant pain. Often this pain is colicky, meaning that it comes and goes. Examples include the pain associated with menstrual cramps, diarrhea, gallbladder pain, and passing a kidney stone.
  • A special form of muscle spasms are the dystonias where an abnormality perhaps exists with the chemicals that help transmit signals within the brain. Examples include torticollis and blepharospasm. Treatment may include medications to help restore the neurotransmitter levels to normal and Botox injections to paralyze the affected muscle and relieve the spasm.

What are common causes of muscle spasms?

There are a variety of causes of muscle spasms, and each depends upon predisposing factors, the part of the body involved, and the environment that the body is in.

Muscle Spasms
Muscle Spasms

Spasms may occur when a muscle is overused, tired, previously injured, or strained. The spasm may occur if the muscle has been overstretched or if it has been held in the same position for a prolonged period of time. In effect, the muscle cell runs out of energy and fluid and becomes hyperexcitable, resulting in a forceful contraction. This spasm may involve part of a muscle, the whole muscle, or even adjacent muscles.

    • Overuse as a cause of skeletal muscle spasm is often seen in athletes who are doing strenuous exercise in a hot environment. This is also an occupational issue with construction workers or others working in a hot environment. Usually, the spasms will occur in the large muscles that are strained, being asked to do the work. When this occurs associated with heat exposure, the condition is also known as heat cramps.

Overuse can also occur with routine daily activities like shoveling snow, or mowing or raking grass, causing muscle spasms of the neck, shoulder, and back.

    • Unfamiliar exercise activities can also cause muscle spasms to occur. Abdominal spasms can occur when a person decides to begin working their abdominal muscles by doing sit-ups and repeating too many too quickly.

Writer’s cramps of the hand and fingers are similarly caused by prolonged use of the small muscles in the hand and the overused muscles cramp. People will routinely rest and stretch their fingers either to prevent or treat this situation.

    • It is commonly thought that dehydration and depletion of electrolytes will lead to muscle spasm and cramping. Muscle cells require enough water, glucose, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium to allow the proteins within them to develop an organized contraction. Abnormal supply of these elements can cause the muscle to become irritable and develop spasm.
    • Atherosclerosis or narrowing of the arteries (peripheral artery disease) may also lead to muscle spasm and cramps, again because an inadequate blood supply and nutrients are delivered to the muscle. Peripheral artery disease can decrease the flow of blood to the legs, causing pain in the legs with activity. There may also be associated muscle cramps.
    • Leg spasms are often seen related to exercise, but cramps may also be seen at night involving calf and toe muscles. Nocturnal leg cramps and restless legs syndrome are considered a type of sleep disturbance. Their prevalence increases with age and often a precise cause is not found.
    • Chronic neck and back pain can lead to recurrent muscles spasms. Large muscle groups make up the trunk, including the neck, chest wall, upper back, lower back, arms, and legs. Spasms in these muscles can be a result of an injury or they may develop over time because of arthritic changes in the spine. Obesity can cause stress and strain of the core muscles of the trunk, resulting in muscle cramps of the neck and upper and lower back. Systemic illnesses like diabetes, anemia (low red blood cell count), kidney disease, and thyroid and other hormone issues are also potential causes of muscle spasms.
    • Diseases of the nervous system, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, or spinal cord injury, can be associated with muscle spasm.
    • Smooth muscle can also go into spasm. When a hollow structure filled with air or fluid is squeezed by the muscle spasm, significant pain may occur, since the fluid or air cannot be compressed. For example, smooth muscle in the intestinal wall can go into spasm, causing waves of pain called colic. Colicky pain which tends to come and go may also occur within the bile duct that empties the gallbladder and may develop after eating.
    • When kidney stones try to pass through the urinary tract, the smooth muscles that are in the walls of the ureter (that connects the kidney to the bladder) may spasm rhythmically and cause significant pain. Often this type of pain is associated with nausea and vomiting and is called renal colic.
    • Muscles that surround the esophagus can go into spasm when acid reflux causes irritation of the lining of the esophagus, resulting in esophagitis or GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease).
    • Diarrhea can be associated with colicky pain, where the muscles within the colon wall spasm just before a watery bowel movement.
    • Menstrual cramps occur when the walls of the uterus contract forcefully.
    • The coronary arteries that supply the heart muscle with blood also have smooth muscle within their walls that may go into spasm. This can cause chest pain that may be indistinguishable from the pain of coronary artery disease (where plaque has accumulated and narrowed the arteries). Coronary artery spasm often occurs in smokers or those who have high cholesterol blood levels. Coronary artery spasm may be triggered by stress, alcohol withdrawal, stimulant drug abuse (especially cocaine) or medications that can constrict or narrow blood vessels. Coronary artery spasm is also known as Prinzmetal’s angina.
    • Dystonias are movement disorders where groups of muscles forcefully contract and cause twisting. Uncontrolled repetitive movements and the inability to maintain normal posture may be the result of this type of muscle spasm and cramping. The symptoms may be very mild initially but gradually progress to become more frequent and aggressive. Occasionally, there is no progression. Examples of this type of muscle spasm include torticollis (where the neck muscles spasm and cause the head to turn to one side), blepharospasm (where there is uncontrolled blinking of the eyes), and laryngeal dystonia that affects the muscles that control speech. Dystonias may be caused by abnormally functioning neurotransmitter chemicals within part of the brain called the basal ganglia. These chemicals (serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine, and GABA) are required to properly send messages between brain cells that begin muscle contraction. Dystonia symptoms may occur as a complication of stroke.

What are risk factors for muscle spasms?

Most people are at risk for developing a muscle spasm at one time in their life, from infant colic to kidney stones. The risks differ depending upon the person’s past medical history, their occupation, and level of physical activity. Examples include the following:

      • Construction and factory workers who work in hot environments are at risk for becoming dehydrated and developing heat cramps. This same situation can occur in athletes, both elite and recreational.
      • Patients with peripheral artery disease can develop leg cramps at night. Risk factors are the same as for stroke and heart attack: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking.
      • Patients who have underlying neurologic disorders are at risk for developing muscle spasms.

 

 

Muscle Relaxants for Back Pain and Neck Pain

Muscle relaxants are medications that help reduce muscle spasms, which are involuntary muscle contractions caused by a spine-related problem, such as whiplash, fibromyalgia, or low back strain.

Often, muscle spasms cause severe pain and may limit your mobility.

If you want to know more Natural Muscle Relaxant, please check this link:

What is the Best Natural Muscle Relaxants?

Muscle relaxants are used to relieve muscle spasms which may result from some conditions which affect the nervous system, such as:

  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Motor neurone disease.
  • Cerebral palsy.
  • Long-term injuries to the head or back.

Cannabis extract is usually started by a consultant in a hospital. It is normally prescribed for people with multiple sclerosis who have tried other muscle relaxants which are not working. In most cases it is given as a four-week trial to see if it helps with symptoms.

In addition, diazepam may be used to relieve lower back pain, or neck pain in conditions such as whiplash. It is addictive so cannot be used for more than a week or two. Methocarbamol is also used for muscle spasm in people with low back pain. Much of the pain in these conditions is due to muscle spasm. The cause of the spasm is different to the nervous system conditions above.

These medicines are usually taken by mouth (tablets, capsules or liquids). In general, your doctor will start off with a low dose and increase this gradually over a number of weeks. This is in order to help your body get used to these medicines. Injections into the back are always started in the hospital.

Cannabis extract is a spray for the mouth. It should be sprayed under the tongue or on to the inside of the cheek once or twice a day. Always change the area in your mouth where you spray, to prevent irritation of the mouth. Like other muscle relaxants you will normally start off with a low dose. The number of sprays used is normally increased over a number of days.

As with most medicines, muscle relaxants have a number of possible side-effects. However, not everyone experiences them and they usually improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine. Most muscle relaxants cause muscle weakness as a side-effect. It is not possible in this leaflet to list all the possible side-effects for these medicines. However, see below for a list of the most common side-effects. For more detailed information, see the leaflet that comes with the medicine packet.

  • Baclofen – feeling sick, tiredness, drowsiness, problems with eyesight, weakness, dizziness, light-headedness, headache, dry mouth, breathing difficulties, aching muscles, sleeplessness or nightmares, feeling anxious or agitated, confusion, unsteadiness, increased need to pass urine, shakiness, increased sweating, and skin rash.
  • Dantrolene – feeling dizzy, sleepy, tired, or generally unwell, diarrhoea, feeling or being sick, tummy (abdominal) pain, headache, loss of appetite, rash, speech or sight difficulties, high temperature (fever), chills, difficulty in breathing, seizures. It may also cause inflammation of the lining around the heart (sometimes with fluid in the lungs). Liver toxicity is also a possible side-effect of dantrolene.
  • Diazepam – feeling sleepy, weak, or light-headed, forgetfulness, feeling confused or unsteady, feeling (or being) aggressive.
  • Methocarbamol – forgetfulness, allergic reactions, being anxious, blurred vision, a slow heart rate, being confused or dizzy, headache, heartburn, feeling or being sick, itching, rash, and low blood pressure.
  • Cannabis extract – feeling dizzy, depressed mood, diarrhoea or constipation, mouth ulcers or pain, feeling tired or sick, appetite changes. Hallucinations have also been reported.
muscle relaxant
muscle relaxant

For a full list of people who should not take each type of muscle relaxant, refer to the specific leaflet for that medication.

  • Baclofen should not usually be given to people who have a stomach ulcer, epilepsy, mental health problems or diabetes.
  • Dantrolene should not be given to people with liver, heart or breathing problems.
  • Diazepam should be avoided in people who have severe breathing difficulties – for example, people who have myasthenia gravis and people with lung problems.
  • Tizanidine should not usually be given to elderly people, or people who have severe problems with their liver.
  • Methocarbamol should not be used for people who have myasthenia gravis or severe breathing problems. It also should not be used in people with epilepsy or brain damage.
  • Cannabis extract can only be prescribed by specialists for people with multiple sclerosis. People who have a personal or family history of hallucinations or delusions or any other severe psychiatric disorder should not take cannabis extract.

Muscle relaxants are sometimes used to treat other conditions – for example, diazepam is sometimes used to treat anxiety or difficulty with sleeping (insomnia). It is given as a pre-medication (often called a ‘pre-med’) before an operation, particularly during procedures that may cause anxiety or discomfort.

It can also be used to treat seizures. Rectal diazepam tubes may be prescribed for this, as they are useful if a quick effect is needed or if it is not possible to give the medicine by mouth.

Some medicines that are given by injection into the vein during surgery are also known as muscle relaxants. They are sometimes called ‘neuromuscular blocking drugs’ and are used to relax the muscles during surgery. They work in a completely different way to baclofen, dantrolene, diazepam, tizanidine, and cannabis extract and are not discussed here.

There are a number of other things to consider when taking muscle relaxants:

  • These medicines can cause drowsiness. If you feel drowsy when taking these medicines, do not operate machinery, do not drive, and do not drink alcohol.
  • Baclofen should not be stopped suddenly. The dose should be lowered slowly over a few weeks and then stopped.
  • Diazepam – people who take this medicine continuously for more than two weeks can become dependent on it. This means that withdrawal symptoms occur if the tablets are stopped suddenly.

Your doctor may prescribe a muscle relaxant to ease muscle spasms, reduce pain, and help your muscles move better. When your muscles move better, it makes other spine pain treatments, such as physical therapy, stretching, and exercise, more effective.

Understanding Spasticity Versus Spasm

Muscle relaxants treat 2 conditions: spasticity and spasm. Spasticity is marked by long-term muscle contraction caused by a brain or spinal cord injury. Spasms, on the other hand, are localized and occur because of a musculoskeletal issue.

    • Antispastics are prescribed to treat spasticity caused by neurological disorders, such as cerebral palsy or spinal cord injury.
    • Antispasmodics are used to treat occasional muscle spasms.

While some antispasmodics may treat spasticity in addition to spasms, antispastics should not be used to treat spasms.

Muscle Relaxants for Muscle Spasms

Muscle spasms are painful and may restrict mobility, which can limit your ability to perform even basic activities. Painful, tight muscles can also interfere with getting a good night’s sleep.

Muscle relaxants may help reduce pain, and improve movement and range of motion, but your doctor will likely recommend that you first try acetaminophen or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). In some cases, these over-the-counter medications will be enough to help alleviate your pain.

If your muscle pain persists, your doctor may prescribe a muscle relaxant in addition to your pain medication. Below are common muscle relaxants (the generic names are listed first, with a brand name example in parentheses):

  • Baclofen (Lioresal)
  • Carisoprodol (Soma)
  • Cyclobenzaprine (Amrix)
  • Metaxalone (Skelaxin)
  • Methocarbamol (Robaxin)

Special Considerations and Potential Muscle Relaxant Side Effects

Muscle relaxants for acute back or neck pain are usually prescribed to relieve short-term muscle pain—and some can be habit-forming. For these reasons, most doctors will write prescriptions with less than 2 weeks’ worth of medication. To reduce your risk of dependency or abuse, use your medication exactly as your doctor prescribes.

The most common side effects associated with muscle relaxants are drowsiness and dizziness. This is because muscle relaxants depress your central nervous system, making you less alert and attentive. As such, avoid alcohol and don’t perform tasks that require your complete attention, such as operating machinery or driving, while taking a muscle relaxant.

Muscle relaxants pose health risks when they are taken with certain medications and supplements, including opioids, sleep aid medications, and St. John’s wort. Make sure your doctor knows every medication and supplement you are taking before starting muscle relaxant therapy.

Muscle Relaxants: Part of a Multidisciplinary Treatment Plan

If your muscle pain doesn’t respond to over-the-counter medications, then muscle relaxants may be a good treatment option to alleviate your muscle spasms. For best results, muscle relaxants should be viewed as part of a treatment plan that may include gentle stretching, physical therapy, and exercise—not the sole treatment. As always, don’t hesitate to discuss your medications and comprehensive spine health plan with your doctor. A solid understanding of your therapeutic options is a strong defense against back pain.

 

 

What side effects can Fioricet cause?

Butalbital/acetaminophen/caffeine is a combination product used for treating headache.

Butalbital is a narcotic that depresses the central nervous system.

Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and fever reducer. It is the active compound in Tylenol. Acetaminophen relieves pain by elevating the pain threshold, that is, by requiring a greater amount of pain to develop before a person feels it. It reduces feverthrough its action on the heat-regulating center of the brain. Specifically, it tells the center to lower the body’s temperature when the temperature is elevated.

Caffeine has pain relieving properties and may boost the action of other pain relievers by mechanisms that are not well understood. It may reduce the activity of pain sensing nerves in the brain. The FDA approved butalbital/acetaminophen/caffeine in November 1984.

Patients taking combination drugs of butalbital, acetaminophen, and caffeine should review the patient safety information such as specific side effects, drug interactions, and pregnancy safety for each of these drugs.

Acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • drowsiness
  • upset stomach
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • depression
  • lightheadedness
  • confusion

If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • skin rash
  • itching
  • difficulty breathing

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • confusion, seizure (convulsions);
  • shortness of breath;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out; or
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Major Fioricet Side Effects

You should check with your doctor immediately if any of these side effects occur when taking acetaminophen / butalbital / caffeine:

More common:

  • Lightheadedness
  • shortness of breath

Incidence not known:

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • black, tarry stools
  • bleeding gums
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • blood in the urine or stools
  • blurred vision
  • change in the frequency of urination or amount of urine
  • chills
  • cough
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty with breathing
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • dry mouth
  • fainting
  • fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse
  • flushed or dry skin
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • hives, itching, or skin rash
  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • joint or muscle pain
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea or vomiting
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • red skin lesions, often with a purple center
  • red, irritated eyes
  • seizures
  • shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips
  • sweating
  • swelling of the feet or lower legs
  • tightness in the chest
  • trembling or shaking of the hands or feet
  • troubled breathing
  • unexplained weight loss
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • weakness

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

We do not suggest you to take Fioricet or Gabapentinfor a long time, you need go to your local health professional to treat your pain without prescription. We think exercising is the best way to relieve your pain. Exercising is a very good methods. Exercising can enhance your immune system and increase your muscle strength and make your nerve strong.
You can also take some nutrition from food. You can try to become a usana distributor and eat health organic food to get rid of your headache or nerve pain. You can also try their whitening toothpaste to make you more beautiful and get rid of your pain. check more detail for usana Proflavanol® C100, USANA® Probiotic and Vita Antioxidant™

 

What special precautions should I follow before I take Fioricet ?

Before taking acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to acetaminophen, butalbital, caffeine, or any other drugs.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin), antidepressants, antihistamines, pain medications, sedatives, sleeping pills, tranquilizers, and vitamins. Many nonprescription pain relievers contain acetaminophen. Too much of this drug can be harmful.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver disease, porphyria, or depression.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, call your doctor.
  • you should know that this drug may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this drug affects you.
  • remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this drug.
  • Butalbital/acetaminophen/caffeine should not be used with MAOI (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) like phenelzine (Nardil) and selegiline (Emsam) because they can significantly increase central nervous system effects of butalbital and increased blood levels of caffeine.Butalbital can increase the effects of narcotic pain killers, alcohol, sedative or hypnotic medications, and other medications that depress the central nervous system. Loss of consciousness, troubled breathing, lowered heart rate, coma, and in severe cases death can occur.