Gabapentin Dosage for Children

Gabapentin is used to help control partial seizures (convulsions) in the treatment of epilepsy. This medicine cannot cure epilepsy and will only work to control seizures for as long as you continue to take it.

Gabapentin is also used to manage a condition called postherpetic neuralgia, which is pain that occurs after shingles.

Gabapentin works in the brain to prevent seizures and relieve pain for certain conditions in the nervous system. It is not used for routine pain caused by minor injuries or arthritis. Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant.

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

      • Capsule
      • Tablet
      • Tablet, Extended Release, 24 HR
      • Solution
      • Suspension

Gabapentin Dosage for Children

Please remember that you are not allowed to buy Gabapentin Online if you are 19 years old and under. Please find a local doctor to prescribe you Gabapentin prescription and buy it in a local Gabapentin pharmacy.

Gabapentin is FDA-approved as a secondary treatment for partial seizures in children 3 years or older with epilepsy. The use of gabapentin in children for any other medical condition is not FDA-approved. Dosing will be determined by both the child’s age and weight.

Gabapentin dosage by age for children older than 3 years
Age (yr) Recommended dosage
3-4 yrs 40 mg per kg (18.2 mg/lb) of body weight divided into three doses Maximum: 50 mg per kg (22.7 mg/lb) of body weight daily
5-11 yrs 20-35 mg per kg (9.1-15.9 mg/lb) of body weight divided into three doses Maximum: 50 mg per kg (22.7 mg/lb) of body weight daily
12 yrs or older 300-600 mg taken three times per day Maximum: 3600 mg per day

Gabapentin is Used to Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

What is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A common complication of diabetes mellitus in which nerves are damaged as a result of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels)

Not many people are aware of the medical condition that is known as Diabetic Neuropathy however more and more people are being diagnosed with having it, and if you have been recently diagnosed with Diabetic Neuropathy then you will need to start to take drug to help manage and control that condition.

Causes of Neuropathic Pain

Exposure to drugs, alcohol, toxins Neuropathic Pain Surgical procedures/ Amputation Traumatic Nerve injury/ compression Metabolic disturbance Viral infection Neuropathic pain is a disease, like myocardial infarction is a disease. Myocardial infarction may be caused by smoking, or hypertension, or diabetes. Multiple different things contribute to the cause of myocardial infarction, but myocardial infarction is the disease. Similarly, neuropathic pain is a disease, and this slide shows many of the different conditions that can result in neuropathic pain.

But the pain is nonprotective. It is something that persists and behaves separately as a disease itself. Cancer related (disease or treatment Vascular related neurodegenerative Nutritional deficiency

The best drug you can take is the fast acting Gabapentin and one of the main reasons why many people who do have Diabetic Neuropathy will take that drug is that it is not only fast acting as mentioned but it is also a very low cost drug to purchase too.

Drugs associated with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

If you do want to take Gabapentin to treat diabetic neuropathy then please do be aware there can be some side effects, and before you make a purchase of Gabapentin you will be best advised to find out what the side effect of Gabapentin when taking it to treat diabetic neuropathy, and if at any time you start to experience any of those side effects then please seek the advice of a Doctor or a medical professional.

Pharmacologic Treatment for Neuropathic pain

Lidocaine patch 5%, capsaicinOpioidsOxycodone, Tramadol, Fentanyl, Morphine, HydrocodoneAntidepressantsTricyclic AntidepressantsAmitryptiline, Nortryptiline, Desipramine, Imipramine, DoxepinSelective Noredrinaline reuptake inhibitorsDuloxetine, VenlafaxineAnticonvulsantsCarbamazepine, Valproate, Lamotrigine, Topiramate, Gabapentin, Pregabalin

 

 

 

Take Gabapentin as an Anticonvulsant

Anticonvulsants (also commonly known as antiepileptic drugs or as antiseizure drugs) are a diverse group of pharmacological agents used in the treatment of epileptic seizures. Anticonvulsants are also increasingly being used in the treatment of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder, since many seem to act as mood stabilizers, and for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

Anticonvulsants suppress the rapid and excessive firing of neurons during seizures. Anticonvulsants also prevent the spread of the seizure within the brain. Some investigators have observed that anticonvulsants themselves may cause reduced IQ in children.   However these adverse effects must be balanced against the significant risk epileptic seizures pose to children and the distinct possibility of death and devastating neurological sequelaesecondary to seizures.

Anticonvulsants are more accurately called antiepileptic drugs (abbreviated “AEDs”), and are often referred to as antiseizure drugs because they provide symptomatic treatment only and have not been demonstrated to alter the course of epilepsy.

Gabapentin (Neurontin) has been approved as adjunctive therapy in adults with partial seizures with or without secondary generalization . Begin with 300 mg daily; increase to 900 to 1,800 mg daily given every 6 to 8 hours.  Side Effects maybe: Somnolence, fatigue, ataxia, dizziness, gastrointestinal upset, dyspnea.

A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog, gabapentin does not interact with GABA receptors. Its mechanism of action is unknown.

Gabapentin is well absorbed orally, circulates mostly unbound in the plasma and is excreted unchanged in the kidneys without appreciable metabolism in the body. Oral bioavailability is approximately 60 percent and is not affected by food. The half-life is five to seven hours and is related to the creatinine clearance. Therefore, excretion is decreased in patients with renal impairment and decreased cardiac function, and in elderly patients. Gabapentin can be removed from the system through hemodialysis.

In clinical studies,  gabapentin was found to be effective in adults with refractory partial seizures and was also effective in preventing the progression of partial seizures to generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

Because gabapentin has no known pharmacokinetic interactions with any other antiepileptic drugs, it is useful in patients taking other antiepileptic medication.

 

What you Should Know Before you Buy Gabapentin online

Keep these considerations in mind if your doctor prescribes gabapentin oral capsule for you.

Buy Gabapentin Online
Buy Gabapentin Online

Before taking gabapentin,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to gabapentin, any other medications, or any of the inactive ingredients in the type of gabapentin you plan to take. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the inactive ingredients.
  • you should know that gabapentin is available in different forms that may be prescribed for different uses. Ask your doctor to be sure that you are not taking more than one product that contains gabapentin.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: antidepressants; antihistamines; medications for anxiety; medications that make you feel dizzy or drowsy; medications for mental illness; naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprosyn, others); opioid (narcotic) medications for pain such as hydrocodone (in Hydrocet, in Vicodin, others), morphine (Avinza, Kadian, MSIR, others), or oxycodone OxyContin, in Percocet, in Roxicet, others); sedatives; medications for seizures; sleeping pills, and tranquilizers. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • if you are taking antacids such as Maalox or Mylanta, take them at least 2 hours before you take gabapentin tablets, capsules, or solution.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had lung or kidney disease. If you will be taking the extended-release tablets, also tell your doctor if you need to sleep during the day and stay awake at night.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking gabapentin, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking gabapentin.
  • you should know that this medication may make you drowsy or dizzy, may slow your thinking, and may cause loss of coordination. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you, and your doctor agrees that it is safe for you to begin these activities.
  • if you are giving gabapentin to your child, you should know that your child’s behavior and mental abilities may change while he or she is taking gabapentin. Your child may have sudden changes in mood, become hostile or hyperactive, have difficulty concentrating or paying attention, or be drowsy or clumsy. Have your child avoid activities that could be dangerous, such as riding a bicycle, until you know how gabapentin affects him or her.
  • remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication.
  • you should know that your mental health may change in unexpected ways and you may become suicidal (thinking about harming or killing yourself or planning or trying to do so) while you are taking gabapentin for the treatment of epilepsy, mental illness, or other conditions. A small number of adults and children 5 years of age and older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as gabapentin to treat various conditions during clinical studies became suicidal during their treatment. Some of these people developed suicidal thoughts and behavior as early as one week after they started taking the medication. There is a risk that you may experience changes in your mental health if you take an anticonvulsant medication such as gabapentin, but there may also be a risk that you will experience changes in your mental health if your condition is not treated. You and your doctor will decide whether the risks of taking an anticonvulsant medication are greater than the risks of not taking the medication. You, your family, or your caregiver should call your doctor right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: panic attacks; agitation or restlessness; new or worsening irritability, anxiety, or depression; acting on dangerous impulses; difficulty falling or staying asleep; aggressive, angry, or violent behavior; mania (frenzied, abnormally excited mood); talking or thinking about wanting to hurt yourself or end your life; withdrawing from friends and family; preoccupation with death and dying; giving away prized possessions; or any other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Be sure that your family or caregiver knows which symptoms may be serious so they can call the doctor if you are unable to seek treatment on your own.

Refill

You are only allowed to buy gabapentin online when you refill and you have taken gabapentin before. It means your local doctors have already prescribed you Gabapentin in the past.

Complete the health questionnaires very carefully

your online doctors only know you by your questionnaires. please complete the form very carefully.

General

Gabapentin oral capsules can be taken with or without food. Taking them with food can help to reduce upset stomach.

Storage

  • Store gabapentin at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C).
  • Don’t store this medication in moist or damp areas, such as bathrooms.

Refills

A prescription for this medication is refillable. You should not need a new prescription for this medication to be refilled. Your doctor will write the number of refills authorized on your prescription.

Travel

When traveling with your medication:

  • Always carry your medication with you, such as in your carry-on bag.
  • Don’t worry about airport X-ray machines. They can’t hurt your medication.
  • You may need to show airport staff the pharmacy label for your medication. Be sure to carry with you the prescription-labeled box that your medication came in.
  • Do not put this medication in your car’s glove compartment or leave it in the car. Be sure to avoid doing this when the weather is very hot or very cold.

Clinical monitoring

Your local doctor will monitor your kidney function.

The Pregnancy, Breastfeeding and Fertility Warning While Taking Gabapentin

Gabapentin capsules, tablets, and oral solution are used along with other medications to help control certain types of seizures in people who have epilepsy. Gabapentin capsules, tablets, and oral solution are also used to relieve the pain of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN; the burning, stabbing pain or aches that may last for months or years after an attack of shingles). Gabapentin extended-release tablets (Horizant) are used to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS; a condition that causes discomfort in the legs and a strong urge to move the legs, especially at night and when sitting or lying down).

Gabapentin is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. Gabapentin treats seizures by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain. Gabapentin relieves the pain of PHN by changing the way the body senses pain. It is not known exactly how gabapentin works to treat restless legs syndrome.

Gabapentin and pregnancy

Gabapentin is not generally recommended in pregnancy as there is not enough information about whether it’s safe for your baby.

However, from the small amount of information that is available, there’s no clear evidence that it’s harmful. It should only be taken if the benefits of the medicine outweigh the risks.

If you take gabapentin for epilepsy, it’s important that this is well treated during pregnancy, as seizures can harm you and your baby. Keep taking gabapentin, but talk to your doctor urgently. They may recommend you change to a different medicine.

If you’re trying to get pregnant or have become pregnant while taking gabapentin, it is recommended to take a high dose of folic acid (5mg a day). You can get this from your doctor or midwife.

Ideally you’ll take high dose folic acid for 3 months before you start trying to get pregnant and for the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Do not worry if you have not taken it before you get pregnant, but start taking it as soon as possible once you know that you are pregnant. It helps your baby to grow normally.

If you take gabapentin around the time of giving birth, your baby may need extra monitoring for a few days after they’re born. This is because they may have withdrawal symptoms from gabapentin.

We do not know what the long term effects of taking gabapentin in pregnancy may be on childhood learning and development. For safety, you’ll usually be advised to take it only if the benefits of the medicine outweigh the risks. Talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks.

Gabapentin and breastfeeding

If your doctor or health visitor says your baby is healthy, you can take gabapentin while breastfeeding. It’s important to keep taking gabapentin to keep you well.

Gabapentin passes into breast milk in small amounts. It has not been known to cause any side effects in breastfed babies.

If your baby is not feeding as well as usual, seems unusually sleepy, has a stomach upset, or if you have any other concerns about your baby, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, health visitor or midwife.

Gabapentin and fertility

There’s no evidence to suggest that taking gabapentin reduces fertility in either men or women. However, discuss your pregnancy plans with a doctor. They may wish to review your medicine and prescribe a higher dose of folic acid for you to take (5mg a day) before you become pregnant.

Speak to a pharmacist or your doctor before taking gabapentin if you’re trying to get pregnant.

What is the Most Important Information I Should Know About Gabapentin?

Do not stop taking NEURONTIN without first talking to your healthcare

provider. Stopping NEURONTIN suddenly can cause serious problems.

NEURONTIN can cause serious side effects including:

1. Suicidal Thoughts. Like other antiepileptic drugs, NEURONTIN may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500.

Call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you:

      • thoughts about suicide or dying
      • attempts to commit suicide
      • new or worse depression
      • new or worse anxiety
      • feeling agitated or restless
      • panic attacks
      • trouble sleeping (insomnia)
      • new or worse irritability
      • acting aggressive, being angry, or violent
      • acting on dangerous impulses
      • an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania)
      • other unusual changes in behavior or mood

How can I watch for early symptoms of suicidal thoughts and actions?

  • Pay attention to any changes, especially sudden changes, in mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings.
  • Keep all follow-up visits with your healthcare provider as scheduled.

Call your healthcare provider between visits as needed, especially if you are worried about symptoms.

Do not stop taking NEURONTIN without first talking to a healthcare provider.

  • Stopping NEURONTIN suddenly can cause serious problems. Stopping a seizure medicine suddenly in a patient who has epilepsy can cause seizures that will not stop (status epilepticus).
  • Suicidal thoughts or actions can be caused by things other than medicines. If you have suicidal thoughts or actions, your healthcare provider may check for other causes.

2. Changes in behavior and thinking –Using NEURONTIN in children 3 to 12 years of age can cause emotional changes, aggressive behavior, problems with concentration, restlessness, changes in school performance, and hyperactivity.

3. NEURONTIN may cause serious or life-threatening allergic reactionsthat may affect your skin or other parts of your body such as your liver or blood cells. This may cause you to be hospitalized or to stop NEURONTIN. You may or may not have a rash with an allergic reaction caused by NEURONTIN. Call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

      • skin rash
      • hives
      • difficulty breathing
      • fever
      • swollen glands that do not go away
      • swelling of your face, lips, throat, or tongue
      • yellowing of your skin or of the whites of the eyes
      • unusual bruising or bleeding
      • severe fatigue or weakness
      • unexpected muscle pain
      • frequent infections

These symptoms may be the first signs of a serious reaction. A healthcare provider should examine you to decide if you should continue taking NEURONTIN.

Gabapentin comes as a capsule, a tablet, an extended-release (long-acting) tablet, and an oral solution (liquid) to take by mouth. Gabapentin capsules, tablets, and oral solution are usually taken with a full glass of water (8 ounces [240 milliliters]), with or without food, three times a day.

These medications should be taken at evenly spaced times throughout the day and night; no more than 12 hours should pass between doses. The extended-release tablet (Horizant) is taken with food once daily at about 5 PM. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take gabapentin exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Gabapentin extended-release tablets cannot be substituted for another type of gabapentin product. Be sure that you receive only the type of gabapentin that was prescribed by your doctor. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about the type of gabapentin you were given.

Swallow the extended-release tablets whole; do not cut, chew, or crush them.

If your doctor tells you to take one-half of a regular tablet as part of your dose, carefully split the tablet along the score mark. Use the other half-tablet as part of your next dose. Properly dispose of any half-tablets that you have not used within several days of breaking them.

If you are taking gabapentin to control seizures or PHN, your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of gabapentin and gradually increase your dose as needed to treat your condition. If you are taking gabapentin to treat PHN, tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve during your treatment.

Gabapentin may help to control your condition but will not cure it. Continue to take gabapentin even if you feel well. Do not stop taking gabapentin without talking to your doctor, even if you experience side effects such as unusual changes in behavior or mood. If you suddenly stop taking gabapentin tablets, capsules, or oral solution, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety, difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, nausea, pain, and sweating. If you are taking gabapentin to treat seizures and you suddenly stop taking the medication, you may experience seizures more often. Your doctor may decrease your dose gradually over at least a week.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with gabapentin and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs) or the manufacturer’s website to obtain the Medication Guide.

How Should I Take Gabapentin?

Read the Gabapentin Medication Guide and, if available, the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start taking gabapentin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Neurontin -400mg
Neurontin -400mg

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor. Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. For children, the dosage is also based on weight.

If you are taking the tablets and your doctor directs you to split the tablet in half, take the other half-tablet at your next scheduled dose. Discard half tablets if not used within several days of splitting them. If you are taking the capsules, swallow them whole with plenty of water.

It is very important to follow your doctor’s dosing instructions exactly. During the first few days of treatment, your doctor may gradually increase your dose so your body can adjust to the medication. To minimize side effects, take the very first dose atbedtime.

Take this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. This drug works best when the amount of medicine in your body is kept at a constant level. Therefore, take gabapentin at evenly spaced intervals at the same time(s) each day. If you are taking this medication 3 times a day to control seizures, do not let more than 12 hours pass between doses because your seizures may increase.

Do not take this medication more often or increase your dose without consulting your doctor. Your condition will not improve any faster and the risk of serious side effects may increase.

Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Some conditions may become worse when the drug is suddenly stopped. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased.

Antacids containing aluminum or magnesium may interfere with the absorption of this medication. Therefore, if you are also taking an antacid, it is best to take gabapentin at least 2 hours after taking the antacid.

Different forms of gabapentin (such as immediate-release, sustained-release, enacarbil sustained-release) are absorbed in the body differently. Do not switch from one form to the other without consulting your doctor.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

The Horizant brand of gabapentin should not be taken during the day. For best results, take Horizant with food at about 5:00 in the evening.

Both Gralise and Horizant should be taken with food.

Neurontin can be taken with or without food.

If you break a Neurontin tablet and take only half of it, take the other half at your next dose. Any tablet that has been broken should be used as soon as possible or within a few days.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

If your doctor changes your brand, strength, or type of gabapentin, your dosage needs may change.Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about the new kind of gabapentin you receive at the pharmacy.

Do not stop using gabapentin suddenly, even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may cause increased seizures. Follow your doctor’s instructions about tapering your dose.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take gabapentin. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you take seizure medication.

Gabapentin can cause you to have a false positive urine protein screening test. If you provide a urine sample for testing, tell the laboratory staff that you are taking gabapentin.

Store tablets and capsules at room temperature away from light and moisture.

Store the liquid medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Gabapentin Dosing for Neuropathic Pain

First, we must consider the different neuropathic pain types. Neuropathic pain can be diverse in nature, encompassing a wide range of pain types, including post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and painful cancer-related neuropathies.

Gabapentin has been shown to be beneficial in treating several types of neuropathic pain; however, the mechanism of action by which gabapentin exerts its analgesic effect is still unknown.

It is suggested that gabapentin may block the calcium channel alpha(2)delta (a2d)-1 receptor in the brain. This protein-modulated receptor is involved in excitatory synapse formation. Therefore, the therapeutic effects of gabapentin may be attributed to prevention of new synapse formations.

Gabapentin was shown to offer substantial improvement in neuropathic pain with side effects that were similar to those on placebo.

Even with sufficient data supporting the use of gabapentin in the treatment of various neuropathic pain conditions, gabapentin only has Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for PHN. Dosing recommendations for off-label use of gabapentin can be somewhat ambiguous, if a recommendation exists at all. Therefore, several studies further investigate dosing regimens specific to other neuropathic pain syndromes.

Gabapentin Dosing Considerations

Three gabapentin products are FDA approved to treat PHN. The different formulations cannot be interchanged and each has its own dosing schedule.

    • For immediate-release gabapentin (Neurontin), dosing may be initiated with 300 mg on day 1, doubled on day 2 (300 mg twice a day), and tripled on day 3 (300 mg 3 times a day). The dose can then be titrated up as needed for pain relief to a maximum dose of 1,800 mg daily (divided into 3 daily doses). Clinical studies referenced in the package insert state that efficacy for a range of doses from 1,800 mg/day to 3,600 mg/day were observed; however, there was no additional benefit seen with doses greater than 1,800 mg/d.
    • Gralise is an extended-release gabapentin formulation that also is FDA approved for PHN with a titration schedule that begins with 300 mg on day 1; 600 mg on day 2; 900 mg on days 3 to 6; 1,200 mg on days 7 to 10; 1,500 mg on days 11 to 14; and 1,800 mg on day 15 and thereafter.
    • The third gabapentin formulation for PHN treatment is another extended-release product, Horizant. The starting dose is 600 mg in the morning for 3 days, increased to 600 mg twice daily on day 4 and thereafter. A daily dose of Horizant greater than 1,200 mg provided no additional benefit at the expense of side effects.

Several studies have evaluated off-label use of gabapentin in the treatment of other neuropathic pain conditions. A randomized, double-blind trial compared gabapentin to placebo in 135 patients with DPN over 8 weeks. The results showed a statistical benefit of gabapentin compared to placebo, at all end points, for pain improvement.

The gabapentin dosing regimen used in this study was 900 mg/d for week 1; 1,800 mg/d for week 2; 2,400 mg/d for week 3; and 3,600 mg/d for week 4. All the patients were titrated up to a dose of 3,600 mg/d, regardless of efficacy at lower doses. Patients who could not tolerate this dose were titrated down to the greatest tolerable dose.

Of the 84 patients randomized to the gabapentin group, 56 (67%) were able to tolerate 3,600 mg/d. During the first week, gabapentin resulted in improvement in sleep interference compared to placebo.

By the second week, gabapentin resulted in improvement in all pain rating scales compared to placebo. Of the 84 patients in the gabapentin group, 70 completed the study, and 7 patients withdrew due to adverse drug events (ADEs). Most ADEs reported in the gabapentin group were of mild or moderate intensity, and the most frequently reported effects were dizziness (23.8%), somnolence (22.6%), headache (10.7%), diarrhea (10.7%), confusion (8.3%), and nausea (8.3%).

A double-blind crossover study (n=40) assessed gabapentin for the treatment of DPN. The dose of gabapentin used in this trial was much lower, with patients titrated up every 3 days to a maximum dose of 900 mg/d. The end points evaluated in this study included level of pain on a visual analog pain scale (VAS), and scores on the present pain intensity scale, the McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ), and the global assessment of pain relief.

Statistical improvement between gabapentin and placebo was noted in only 1 end point, the MPQ score, with a mean reduction of 8.9 points for gabapentin compared to 2.2 points with placebo (P=0.03). No serious ADEs were noted, and the most common ADEs of gabapentin were drowsiness, fatigue, and imbalance. The results of this study suggest that gabapentin is not effective or is only minimally effective in treating painful DPN at a dose of 900 mg/d.5

A search in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was conducted to further examine dosing regimens for neuropathic pain. In a review analyzing 37 studies for gabapentin treatment in chronic neuropathic pain, the main outcome was Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) definitions for moderate and substantial benefit in chronic pain studies.6 These were defined as follows:

  • 30% reduction in pain over baseline (moderate)
  • 50% reduction in pain over baseline (substantial)
  • Much or very much improved on Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) (moderate)
  • Very much improved on PGIC (substantial)
  • Gabapentin was shown to be better than placebo across all studies for IMMPACT outcomes. The review concentrated on gabapentin doses of 1,200 mg/d or greater and reported that doses at or above this threshold were reasonably effective for treatment of various neuropathic pain types.

The upper threshold for maximum effective gabapentin doses ranged from 2,400 mg/d to 3,600 mg/d in the majority of studies reviewed.

ADEs and withdrawal rates for patients taking gabapentin doses of 1,200 mg/d or greater were compared to those for patients taking placebo in 20 studies with 4,125 participants. Common ADEs seen were somnolence, drowsiness, and sedation.

These occurred in 14% of participants in the gabapentin group versus 5% of those taking placebo. Data also showed gabapentin was associated with a higher incidence of dizziness (19% vs 5%), peripheral edema (7% vs 2.2%), and ataxia or gait disturbances (8.8% vs 1.1%).

The rate of serious events was similar between gabapentin and placebo groups. Twenty-two studies involving 4,448 patients reported on participant withdrawals due to ADEs, which occurred in 11% of patients taking gabapentin compared to 7.9% of those taking placebo.6

Postmarketing Abuse

Postmarketing reports have described symptoms of agitation, confusion, and disorientation upon abrupt withdrawal of gabapentin. Cases usually involve other potentiating factors, such as the use of higher than recommended doses for unapproved indications, a history of poly-substance abuse, or the use of gabapentin to relieve symptoms of withdrawal from other substances.In a study of postmortem toxicology, cases that tested positive for gabapentin or pregabalin were included to determine if abuse of these drugs contributed to the fatalities. Of the 13,766 cases investigated, 0.31% were positive for gabapentin. Of the gabapentin cases, 18.6% were considered abuse, and 4.7% were poisonings. An overwhelming majority of abuse cases (87.5%) also involved opioid intoxication, and 100% involved alcohol and/or opioids. In addition, a greater number of pregabalin cases were designated as abuse cases than gabapentin cases (48.1% vs 18.6%, respectively).7

Conclusion

Gabapentin has sufficient evidence showing its efficacy and safety in treating neuropathic pain. Effective treatment doses of gabapentin for neuropathic pain tend to be higher compared to effective treatment doses for other conditions. Gabapentin is a relatively safe medication. The most prevalent effects seen are drowsiness, somnolence, and sedation. It is necessary to start at lower doses of gabapentin and titrate up to a therapeutic dose. Ataxia and somnolence appear to exhibit a positive dose-response relationship; therefore, titrating the dose of gabapentin may help manage possible ADEs.

Gabapentin is also Used for Prevention of Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a muscular condition that affects many people. It refers to muscle fatigue and pain felt across different muscle groups in the body, not just on isolated areas.  Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues.

The term fibromyalgia directly means pain that is embedded in the tissues of the muscles, specifically the fibrous tissues.  This very acute pain starts from the ligaments, the tendons, and other such connective muscle tissues that are present all over the muscular system of the body.  Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals.

Fibromyalgia Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event.

Women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than are men.  Many people who have fibromyalgia also have tension headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression.

There are however some controversial theories regarding  Fibromyalgia that propose that this condition is a psychosomatic illness, that is, it is a disorder brought about by psychological factors and not necessarily physical factors. This reasoning is mainly brought about by the strong evidence available that relates Fibromyalgia to major depression.

An in-depth review regarding the association of major depression disorders with Fibromyalgia brought out significant similarities between the two in terms of psychological characteristics and neuroendoctrine abnormalities in the patients.

Researchers believe repeated nerve stimulation causes the brains of people with fibromyalgia to change. This change involves an abnormal increase in levels of certain chemicals in the brain that signal pain (neurotransmitters). In addition, the brain’s pain receptors seem to develop a sort of memory of the pain and become more sensitive, meaning they can overreact to pain signals.

Medications designed to treat epilepsy are often useful in reducing certain types of nerve pain. Gabapentin (Neurontin) is sometimes helpful in reducing fibromyalgia symptoms.  Gabapentin is a medicine used to treat pain caused by nerves that are not working properly.   Gabapentin changes the way that the nerves send messages to the brain. It can be taken in a tablet or a liquid, with or without food.  Doses are usually 1200 mg to 2400 mg each day. At the start of treatment low doses are used to minimise side effects, but the dose is usually increased after a few weeks.

At the reviews of gabapentin for fibromyalgia in drugs.com ,  almost 70% Fibromyalgia Patients think Gabapentin can cure their fiobromyalgia disease.  But almost 20% fiobromyalgia Patients think it doesnot work. ( Rating 1 -2 %),  another 15% patients think it do work but the effect is not that good ( Rating 3 – 5 ).

One of the patient said:

“I have had fibro for 7 years, finally have a doctor that prescribed me Gabapentin. It’s amazing I feel like a normal person again. I sleep through the night, with no pain anymore. My anxiety is gone also, which is awesome. I know everyone is different, but it works for me. I have had little to no side effects yet. First few doses was a bit of an air head other than that no complaints. Being able to function pain free and agitation free is a blessing.”

Another Fiobro patient said:

“I had the best results, in relieving the pain, with gabapentin. I was able to work through the other symptoms. The etodolac helped with the inflammation. I was doing well, until the muscle spasms started, again. I suspect the mould allergies exasperated the symptoms. So, cyclobenzeprine was added. I don’t know what happened, but I was jobless, homeless, and very sick by the time a CVS pharmacist recognized the V.A. had put me on another toxic, prescription drug cocktail. When I brought it to the V.A.s attention, as usual, it was ignored. The medications that help, are the ones the V.A. will not prescribe to veterans like myself. They say speak up, if you do, expect to be classified as mentally ill, violent, aggressive, involuntarily committed”

NatalieW555 Said:
“I was suffering from fibromyalgia pain most of my adult life, I’m 52 by the way, not realizing there was this wonderful medication available to me…I started it about 2 years ago and it really makes a HUGE difference in how my body feels. I take 300 mg 3X daily. I hope it never quits working for me…you should give it a try….It has no side effects on me.”

Member Annabqnm Said:

“Pretty much saved my life. 13 years ago fibromyalgia symptoms (severe pain especially legs and shoulders), started. My father was taking high doses of gabapentin for chronic guillaune barre. He urged me to try it–and it was the first real sleep I had in months! My rheumatologist had me on 1600mg. 3x, gradually lowered to 1600 mg. 2x. Studies at Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins show very few (and very mild) side effects, even at high doses. The only problem I have is if I forget to take them. Then I get flu like symptoms. I was able to continue my career (elementary school teacher) with no problems. Retired this year age 66 and very active. BTW my memory seems better than most friends my age.”

But 30% Fibro customers think Gabapentin is not effective for their Fibro disease. I looked the reviews they have wrote, I found most of them are just back pain or leg pain but not Fiobromyalgia. But some Fibro patients do think it has some side effects, especially thought problems such as depression.

One of the Fibro patient said:

“I have “fibromyalgia,” severe muscle pain from a twisted spine/congenitally deformed vertebrae. I was getting better with yoga, but hurt my back/rib muscles overdoing. I developed depression on gabapentin after a few weeks. At first it dulled the pain and made me feel lightheaded, and I had memory problems. Then my anxiety increased and the pain continued, and hit a real low. I spent two weeks in a psych ward until a brilliant psych nurse who believed in treating muscle pain. I am now recovering on a mix of robaxin, a muscle relaxer, a low dose of valium for rib spasms, and prozac and remeron (for sleep) and hope to get off all of them once I can exercise again. Similar reaction to Lyrica four years ago.”

Gabapentin is effective for Fibro. But you need consider whether you can endure the side effects of gabapentin. Please check our website for the Gabapentin Side Effects.

The off-lable use of Gabapentin for migraine

Gabapentin is as an anti-epileptic drug and as an analgesic, particularly for pain of the neuropathic or neurogenic type.  When used for controlling epilepsy, it is usually used in conjunction with another anti-epileptic drug.  But Gabapentin is widely used  to treat nerve pain or neuropathic pain than it is to treat epilepsy.

Gabapentin is also sometimes used to relieve the pain of diabetic neuropathy (numbness or tingling due to nerve damage in people who have diabetes), and to treat and prevent hot flashes (sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) in women who are being treated for breast cancer or who have experienced menopause (”change of life”, the end of monthly menstrual periods). Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication for your condition.

It is also widely used to treat Anxiety and Migraine prevention.

One of Gabapentin “off-label” usage is for migraine prevention and treatment, including migraines with or without aura, vestibular migraines. It can reduce the frequency of headaches, pain intensity, and the use of symptomatic medications. Gabapentin is a good preventive therapy for migraines refractory to standard medications.

The chemical structure of gabapentin is related that of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) which is a neurotransmitter in the brain. The exact mechanism as to how gabapentin controls epilepsy and relieves pain is unknown, but it probably acts like the neurotransmitter GABA.

The effective dose of gabapentin varies greatly. Some persons need only 200-300 mg a day whereas others may need 3000 mg or more a day. It may take several weeks to become effective, so it is important to stay on it for an adequate length of time.

The Efficacy of gabapentin in migraine prophylaxis experiment shows  gabapentin is an effective prophylactic agent for patients with migraine.

In the Clinical trials143 patients evaluated gabapentin for migraine prophylaxis.  After 3 months the patients taking gabapentin had a reduction of the migraine frequency by 1.5 migraines per month (or by 35.7%) compared with a reduction of 0.6 migraines per month for the placebo group. Also, gabapentin reduced the headache frequency by 50% or greater in 45% patients compared with only 16% patients on placebo. The most frequently reported adverse events  were asthenia, dizziness, somnolence, and infection.

In Famous medical websites, migraine patients also review the gabapentin as the migraine prevention medicine. They rate Gabapentin 8.1 stars out of ten stars. It is a high mark and means Gabapentin is a very effective medicine for migraine prevention.

I haven’t been taking this medication for long but it’s helped so much. Neuro started me off on 300mg at night and now I’m at 600mg at night. It doesn’t make me sleepy or drowsy. Before starting gabapentin, I was having migraines just about every day. I started having aphasia and vision changes with my migraines, so I decided to take action. I’ve only been on it for almost 2 weeks but I’ve been migraine free and my triggers are no longer triggers at this point, which is fantastic. I should note it has reduced my appetite but this is not a negative thing.” –  Crystaldreams July 25, 2017

This medication is..interesting. I am 20 with what a few doctors think is Fibro and a chronic pain condition but was Rx’d this med by a psych doctor for tension migraines. While it does NOT really help with migraines, it has been making me awfully sleepy and drowsy, and helping with weird aches and pains throughout my body. It can be used as a mood stabilizer and I can see why- because it makes you so drowsy you can’t do or say anything, especially after taking the evening dose! I’ve been afraid to drive any car since starting this. It makes me more drowsy than my anxiety meds which don’t make me drowsy at all! Doctor is raising the dose because since writing that first part- I have become quite used to the med, where my dose does NOT work  – Chelseabergstresser (taken for 1 to 6 months) May 11, 2017

“I have chronic Migraine called Glutamate Storm. First dose of 100mgs made me sleep 36 hours. Before I got the prescription I never slept more than 5 hours per night and often only got 2 hours of sleep per night. But I did not want to take a prescription every day, so I only took it when my ears were ringing really loud and I was sleep deprived. But then I noticed that my chronic cough was always gone the day after taking Gabapentin. So I started taking it every day for that. When I did, my headache and ear ringing got a lot better. I am now taking 400 mgs per day. I had bad breath at first, but it’s gone. Dr. says it might have detoxed something. I am all for that. Better out than in. This drug has helped me a lot. And I am not pro-pharma.” – Gylm April 26, 2017